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Rules and Regulations of Horse Racing

22 Feb

Horse Racing Syndicates Understand the Regulations

Thoroughbred horse racing is a unique sport in which there is no central governing body of the sport. Instead, each state has its own horse racing board or governing body that regulates that state’s rules and regulations. In some ways this is can be a good thing because rules can be tailored to specific needs or wants of the racing population in each state, that all states as a whole may not agree upon. But on the contrary, it can pose some very difficult problems for racing from state to state as far as regulations in certain types of races as well as medication rules and testing just to name a few.

In California, thoroughbred horse racing is governed by the California Horse Racing Board (CHRB). The CHRB was formed in 1933 in order to ensure the integrity, viability, and safety of the California horse racing industry. Their interests involve; safety of the horses, promoting racing and breeding, and regulation among pari-mutuel wagering in the state among other things. These broad areas are even more regulated between licensed race tracks across the state of California by internal management and officials at each track.

Each licensed race track in California abides by the same rules that the CHRB sets forth and works to ensure that the integrity and safety of the game is upheld each day. Specifically, each track has a group of Stewards, usually three, that act as the officials of the track. Their duties involve watching each race closely in order to make sure that any infractions or violations that may affect the outcome of the race are handled properly. A big reason the officials job is so important is because they must uphold the pari-mutuel integrity of the game so that the pay outs of the race will properly represent the winner that has not violated any of the rules set forth by the CHRB.

For example, when horses impede one another or a horse cuts another horse off causes a horse to lose significant ground in the race or in the worst case fall down, it is the job of the stewards to review the situation right on the spot to make a decision who was in the wrong. It will happen where one horse wins a race, but the stewards call an “inquiry” to the race where they feel they must review an incident to make sure the correct horse has won the race without foul. This is very important not just for the safety of the horses but also for the integrity of the game because there are thousands and sometimes millions wagered in horse racing events.

Unfortunately, like any sport today there will always be people trying to gain an unfair advantage. Hopefully, the CHRB system set in place has the ability to be flexible and change with the times so that those who try to challenge the integrity of our game will be stopped and this game can be played on a level playing field. It is essential for thoroughbred partnerships and owners alike to stay involved and up to date with racing regulations and take a stand for better drug testing and putting people with integrity in positions of power and importance in this game. Without believing in the rules and regulations set forth by the CHRB and those governing bodies in states across the U.S., racing will become vulnerable to those trying to gain an unfair advantage.

Blinkers On

Blinkers On Racing Stable, a leader in thoroughbred horse racing partnerships, brings together the finest in thoroughbred horse racing expertise with the best in business know-how, and above all, a team of people you can trust, to manage your investment. We are committed to helping you experience the joys of thoroughbred horse ownership. For more information on thoroughbred partnerships visit our website or request an information package about our partnership. Keep up with horse racing in California by reading our Blog, finding us on Facebook, following us on Twitter, checking us out on LinkedIn, or visiting our YouTube Channel!

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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